Chocolate Haupia Pie…Chocolate Haupia Pie…Chocolate Haupia Pie! You just caught me in a typical daydream. See this pie is one of my favorite desserts in the world, and it’s one of the foods that takes me back to Hawaii. In fact, my last day living in Hawaii I bought a chocolate haupia pie by Ted’s Bakery and took it to watch the sun set at (where else?) Sunset Beach! I ate the entire pie, right out of the pan. Needless to say I did not need my airline meal on the flight that night!

This was one of the first Hawaii foods I craved after moving to Washington, and so for almost three years now I’ve been perfecting the recipe. I bring it to potlucks, serve it for dessert when friends are over for dinner, and gladly take any opportunity to work on it. Sometimes I’m lazy and make it in a pre-made graham cracker or shortbread crust. Sometimes I use milk chocolate, sometimes a frozen pie crust. But after much experimentation, I’ve come up with the perfect recipe!

The crust is crunchy and rich with Macadamia Nuts and Quaker Oats. The chocolate haupia layer is absolutely decadent made with quality dark chocolate. Oh, what is haupia you ask? Here’s part of the wikipedia definition:

Haupia is a traditional coconut milk-based Hawaiian dessert often found at luaus in Hawaiʻi and other local gatherings. Since World War II, it has become popular as a topping for white cake, especially at weddings. Although technically considered a pudding, the consistency of haupia closely approximates gelatin dessert and is usually served in blocks like gelatin.

Me, I just say haupia is a dreamy creamy coconut dessert that goes great with chocolate. So if you like chocolate and coconut, you will LOVE this! One very important thing with this crust is to make sure you butter the pie pan, otherwise it’s a pain to try and get the pieces out. If you get a chance to try this, let me know what you think!

Macadamia Nut Crusted Dark Chocolate Haupia Pie
serves 8

3/4 cup flour
1/8 cup granulated sugar
1/8 cup packed brown sugar
3/4 stick cold butter (6 TBS)
1/2 cup uncooked Quaker Oats
1/4 cup chopped Macadamia Nuts

6 ounces good quality dark chocolate
1 13.5 oz can coconut milk (or a little over 1.5 cups)
1 cup 2% milk
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup cornstarch
1 cup water

whipped cream:
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1/8 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9 inch pie pan. Mix flour, granulated sugar and brown sugar in medium bowl; cut in butter with a fork until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in oats and nuts. Press the mixture into bottom and sides of prepared pie pan. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.

While crust is baking, make haupia by whisking coconut milk, milk and sugar together in a saucepan. While bringing coconut mixture to a boil, whisk cornstarch and water together in a separate bowl. Reduce coconut mixture to a simmer and pour in cornstarch mixture. Continue whisking until mixture is thick.

Remove crust from oven when done and put in fridge to cool slightly.

In a medium microwave safe bowl, microwave for 1- 1 1/2 minutes and stir with a fork to melt. Pour half of haupia into the chocolate and mix well. Pour chocolate haupia into pie crust. Pour remaining white haupia in a layer on top of chocolate haupia. Place pie in refrigerator to cool at least 1 hour.

Whip heavy cream, sugar and vanilla until stiff peaks form. Pipe or spread onto pie and top with shaved chocolate. Cool another hour in fridge.

Update: I’ve entered this in 1 Family Friendly Food’s Cake Collection!

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